Top
POLL POSITION
What Are You Watching In July 2018
 
pollcode.com free polls
QUICK HITS

• Telemundo Deportes said its complete presentation of all 64 2018 World Cup matches reached 36.6 million TV viewers, exceeding the Spanish-language reach for the 2010 tournament by +13% (32.3 million), and coming within 1.3 Million of the 2014 World Cup (37.9M).

• The San Francisco Marathon has signed a three-year deal naming Biofreeze topical pain relief product as title sponsor, beginning with the event July 29, as well as the The Berkeley Half Marathon.

• Rock & Brews Restaurants have joined with Def Leppard and Seattle-based Elysian Brewing Company to introduce Def Leppard Pale to their customers and are also offering a chance to win tickets to see Def Leppard on tour this year.

ESPN’s 14th Annual ESPYS Auction benefiting the V Foundation for Cancer Research has launched on eBay and will continue through Wednesday, July 18. This year’s auction will feature 80+ experience. Details at https://www.ebay.com/rpp/espn.

KEEPING SCORE

2018 WNBA ALL-STARS BY POSITION
Guards
• Seimone Augustus, Lynx    
• Sue Bird, Storm
• Skylar Diggins-Smith, Wings
• Chelsea Gray, Sparks
• Jewell Loyd, Storm
• Kayla McBride, Aces    
• Allie Quigley, Sky
• Diana Taurasi, Mercury
• Kristi Toliver, Mystics

Frontcourt
• DeWanna Bonner, Mercury
• Liz Cambage, Wings
• Tina Charles, Liberty
• Elena Delle Donne, Mystics
• Brittney Griner, Mercury
• Sylvia Fowles, Lynx
• Angel McCoughtry, Dream
• Maya Moore, Lynx
• Chiney Ogwumike, Sun
• Nneka Ogwumike, Sparks
• Candace Parker, Sparks
• Breanna Stewart, Storm
• A’ja Wilson, Aces

WNBA All-Star Gam July 28 in Target Center, Minneapolis (ABC)

BUY SELL

WEEKEND BOX OFFICE (July 13-15)

1. Hotel Transylvania 3 $44.1M
2. Ant-Man and the Wasp $28.8M
3. Skyscraper $25.4M
4. Incredibles 2 $16.2M
5. Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom $15.5M
6. The First Purge $9.1M
7. Sorry to Bother You $4.3M
8. Sicario $3.8M
9. Uncle Drew $3.2M
10. Ocean’s 8 $2.9M

SOURCE: COMSCORE.com

SEARCH

NYSportsJournalism.com + Topic Of Requested Search

EA Sports Madden NFL 19 See More Ads Below

COLLEGE

Men's Hoops Are 'Toxic'
No. 1 Colleges Since '92
Notre Dame Builds Brand
Cancer Drives Home
CFB Title Games '21-24

Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future.
Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/johnfkenn121400.html#46Ul8rBF4XpB4lo0.99
Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future.
Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/johnfkenn121400.html#JZxA5jXY4rCwemgZ.99
Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future.
Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/johnfkenn121400.html#JZxA5jXY4rCwemgZ.99
Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future.
Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/johnfkenn121400.html#46Ul8rBF4XpB4lo0.99
Wednesday
Apr252018

Commission On College Basketball Report: 'Toxic Mix Of Perverse Incentives To Cheat'

By Barry Janoff

April 25, 2018: The Independent Commission on College Basketball was established on Oct. 11, 2017, to “assess the state of the enterprise and to recommend transformational changes to address multiple issues and challenges.”

Led by former secretary of state Condoleezza Rice, the commission came down hard on the NCAA in some areas, commended it in other areas, took a pass in yet others in a 60-page report released today (April 25).

It comes as the FBI is investigating payments, payoffs and other actions by universities, coaches and/or student-athletes.

It also comes as sponsorship spending on college athletics totaled a record $1.24 billion in the 2017-2018 season, a 4.5% increase over 2017, according to research and consulting firm ESP Properties, Chicago.

In addition, in 2017, national TV ad spend during March Madness was a record $1.28 billion, up slightly from 2016’s $1.24 billion, according to media intelligence firm Kantar Media, NY.

The 2018 Tournament is expected to set another record when final totals are assessed.

Where does this and other money go?

At a time when the debate over whether or not to pay college athletes has risen to a new crescendo, the NCAA said, “NCAA schools distribute more than $3.3 billion in athletics scholarships each year.”

The NCAA also said that 80% of college athletes are earning degrees, “The highest rate ever.”

“In brief, it is the overwhelming assessment of the Commission that the state of men’s college basketball is deeply troubled,” the Independent Commission on College Basketball report read. “The levels of corruption and deception are now at a point that they threaten the very survival of the college game as we know it.

"It has taken some time to get here, and it will take time to change course.”

“The levels of corruption and deception are now at a point that they threaten the very survival of the college game as we know it."

The commissioners said that they wanted to be very clear about something: “There is much to admire about college basketball even with its significant challenges. The commitment and hard work of student-athletes is seen on basketball courts across the country.”

According to the Report, ”Lost in the talk of big money and corruption is colleges’ central mission to provide higher education to students. There is debate about how to measure the graduation rate for college students, including student-athletes.

“There is, however, general agreement that the graduation rate for men’s Division I basketball players lags behind that of other student-athletes, perhaps significantly. NCAA schools must take seriously the obligation to help all student-athletes obtain the education they are promised.”

The commissioners took direct aim at the cost of running college hoops programs and the value of student-athletes, supporting what is common knowledge.

“Millions of dollars are now generated by television contracts and apparel sponsorship for the NCAA, universities and coaches,” according to the report. “The financial stake in success has grown exponentially; and thus, there is an arms race to recruit the best talent — and if you are a coach — to keep your job.

“Future stars and their families know their value — and can be tempted to monetize their worth as soon as possible since they will not be compensated in college. Some agents, summer coaches and other third parties act as intermediaries and facilitators.

“In other words, the environment surrounding college basketball is a toxic mix of perverse incentives to cheat.”

The Commission made a number of recommendations, among them:

End One-and-Done: “The Commission calls on the NBA and the National Basketball Players Assn. again to make 18-year-olds eligible for the NBA draft, so that high school players who are drafted may proceed to the NBA.

“The NCAA lacks the legal power to change one-and-done on its own; the power to make this change lies exclusively with the NBA and the NBPA.”

Allow Student-Athletes To Test Their Professional Prospects And Maintain Their Eligibility If They Do Not Sign A Professional Contract.

Permit Students To Receive Meaningful Assessment of Professional Prospects Earlier With Assistance From Certified Agents.

On Paying College Players: “Paying modest salaries to Division I basketball players will not address the particular corruption the Commission confronts, nor will providing student-athletes a modest post-graduation trust fund based on licensing of names, images and likeness.’’

Provide Resources To Make The Promise of A College Education Real: ”The Commission recommends that the NCAA immediately establish a substantial fund and commit to paying for the degree completion of student-athletes with athletic scholarships who leave member institutions after progress of at least two years towards a degree.”

Enact and Impose Core Punishments With Significant Deterrent Effect: “The Commission recommends the following increases in the core penalty structure: (i) increase the competition penalties for Level I violations to allow a five-year post-season ban; (ii) increase the financial penalties for Level I violations to allow loss of all revenue sharing in post-season play, including the NCAA tournament, for the entire period of the ban; (iii) increase the penalties for a show-cause order to allow life-time bans; (iv) increase the penalties for head coach restrictions to allow bans of more than one season; and (v) increase the penalties for recruiting visit violations to allow full-year visit bans.”

Enlist the Apparel Companies in Transparency and Accountability Efforts: “The apparel companies that actively sponsor non-scholastic basketball are public companies. It appears, however, that they do not have effective controls in place in their spending in non-scholastic basketball.

“The Commission calls on the boards of these companies to publicly support and implement financial transparency and accountability with respect to their own investments in non-scholastic basketball. Particularly in light of the facts uncovered in the recent FBI investigation, these public companies should be concerned about how their money is used in non-scholastic basketball.”

NBAPA executive director Michele Roberts and NBA commissioner Adam Silver issued a statement in response to the Commission:

“The NBA and the NBPA thank Secretary Rice and the members of the Commission on College Basketball for their commitment to address the issues facing men’s college basketball. We support NCAA policy and enforcement reforms that will better safeguard the well-being of players while imposing greater accountability on representatives and programs that fail to uphold the values of the game.

“We also share the Commission's concern with the current state of youth basketball and echo that all stakeholders — including the NBA, NBPA, NCAA, and USA Basketball — have a collective responsibility to help bring about positive change.

“Regarding the NBA’s draft eligibility rules, the NBA and NBPA will continue to assess them in order to promote the best interests of players and the game.”

NCAA president Mark Emmert in a statement said, “The NCAA appreciates the thorough review and comprehensive work by the Commission on College Basketball. The Board of Governors and Division I Board of Directors will now review the independent commission’s recommendations to determine the appropriate next steps.”

See the Full Report Here

Back to Home Page