Tuesday
Jun092009

New NBA All-Star Game Plan Leaves Many Cities Out In The Cold

June 9, 2009: Good news for some cities in the NBA, bad news for others. When the NBA said that its 2011 All-Star game would be played in Los Angeles, it also said it plans to shorten its rotation and focus on fewer cities for the event. Los Angeles hosted the All-Star Game in 2004, and the 2011 event will be record fifth time for the city. Commissioner David Stern cited amenities, hotel accommodations, logistics and other factors for the strategy. He also said he sees the 2011 All-Star Game having a $100 million economic impact on Los Angeles. The 2010 All-Star Game will be played in the new Cowboys Stadium in Dallas, the first time the area has hosted the game since 1986.

"One of the things I've said before is that we're likely to shorten the rotation a bit because it's getting more difficult to find cities with the kinds of amenities, close hotel accommodations, the convention center and the like, and L.A. has been a popular destination," said Stern during a press conference in Los Angeles. " And when we started to look at the rotation, this seemed a good time to do it . . . It's been very successful here. The last one was a great success. And with L.A. Live and the new hotel construction Downtown, it will be even better for us . . . It means $100 million in economic impact."

Since Los Angeles last hosted the event, the NBA All-Star Game has been played in Denver (2005), Houston (2006), Las Vegas (2007), New Orleans (2008) and Phoenix (2009). Some cities that might be on the outside looking in are Salt Lake City (which last hosted an NBA All-Star Game in 1993), Charlotte (1991), Indianapolis (1985), Detroit (1979), Milwaukee (1977) and even Boston, which has not been the site of an NBA All-Star Game since 1964 in a game in which Bob Cousy was named MVP.

The NBA's 60th All-Star Game will be played Feb. 20, 2011 at Staples Center, which also will host the Rookie Challenge, Youth Jam and All-Star Saturday Night. The All-Star Jam Session will be staged at the Los Angeles Convention Center next door. AEG, which owns Staples Center, is currently building L.A. Live, which already houses the West Coast production center of ESPN. By 2011, a 54-story, 1,001-room complex that includes two hotels, the Ritz Carlton and JW Marriott, and 224 luxury condos will be completed, giving the NBA additional space across the street from Staples Center. "Its state-of-the-art facilities, passionate fans, and first-class hospitality and entertainment options make Los Angeles an ideal host for NBA All-Star," said Stern. Back to Home Page