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• Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame Finalists Class of 2018: Ray Allen, Maurice Cheeks, Charles “Lefty” Driesell, Hugh Evans, Grant Hill, Jason Kidd, Steve Nash, Rudy Tomjanovich, Chris Webber, Kim Mulkey, Katie Smith, Tina Thompson, Wayland Baptist University. Class of 2018 will be named during the NCAA Men’s Final Four weekend in San Antonio March 31-April 2.

• Serena Williams, who said her first auto purchase was a while Lincoln Navigator SUV she named “Ginger,” has signed to become an official spokesperson for the brand. A social media-based marketing campaign includes videos of Williams talking about and driving the 2018 Navigator, with ongoing videos to follow. “Partnering with a brand like Navigator comes from a genuine place,” she said in the first video. “Let’s just be honest: Serena Williams needs to be in the new Navigator.”

• The Smashing Pumpkins unveil 'Shiny And Oh So Bright' 36-city tour, their first tour in nearly 20 years, with founding members Billy Corgan, Jimmy Chamberlin, James Iha. Produced by Live Nation.

KEEPING SCORE

Most Exciting Sports Worldwide
1. Athletics (i.e. Olympics) 47% Very/Quite Exciting
2. Tennis 43%
3. Football (soccer) 43%
4. Rugby 41%
5. Gymnastics 36%
6. Boxing 32%
7. Formula 1 32%
8. Swimming 26%
9. Horse Racing 25%
10. Cycling 25%

Most Boring Sports Worldwide
1. Golf 70% Very/Quite Boring
2. U.S. Football 59%
3. Cricket 58%
4. Darts 58%
5. Snooker 57%
6. Basketball 52%
7. Horse Racing 52%
8. Cycling 50%
9. Formula 1 49%
10. Boxing 46%

Poll from YouGov.com

BUY SELL

Top Selling MLS Player Jerseys
1. Miguel Almirón Atlanta United
2. Bastian Schweinsteiger Chicago Fire
3. Josef Martínez Atlanta United
4. Jordan Morris Seattle Sounders
5. David Villa NYCFC
6. Clint Dempsey Seattle Sounders
7. Sebastian Giovinco Toronto FC
8. Kaká Orlando City FC
9. Andrea Pirlo NYCFC
10. Nicolás Lodeiro Seattle Sounders
SOURCE MLS STORE

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Kellogg's: Chloe Kim Winter Games Ads Below

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CFB Title Games '21-24
No. 1 Colleges Since '92
NCAA: More Health $$$
Cancer Drives Home
NCAA Reballs Madness

Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future.
Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/johnfkenn121400.html#46Ul8rBF4XpB4lo0.99
Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future.
Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/johnfkenn121400.html#JZxA5jXY4rCwemgZ.99
Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future.
Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/johnfkenn121400.html#JZxA5jXY4rCwemgZ.99
Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future.
Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/johnfkenn121400.html#46Ul8rBF4XpB4lo0.99
Tuesday
Sep292015

Study: Student-Athletes Getting $1M More For Food, More Choices, Healthier Options

By Barry Janoff

September 29, 2015: In 1991, the NCAA placed limitations on the amount of money that could be spent and the total intake of meals, snacks and dietary supplements among Div. I student-athletes in what was described as an attempt to ensure "competitive balance" among schools and teams.

In April 2014, the NCAA lifted those restrictions "in an effort to meet the nutritional needs of all student-athletes." The policy went into effect on Aug. 1, 2014.

Now, a new study shows that major college athletic programs over the past year have boosted their spending for meals, snacks and dietary supplements to feed athletes, from $534,000 to more than $1.3 million, a 145% year-over-year increase.

The study from the Collegiate and Professional Sports Dietitians Assn. also shows that when dietitians who work with NCAA student-athletes were asked to rank how satisfied their athletes appear to be with the greatly expanded food offerings, with ten being "completely satisfied," the cumulative score was 8.

The survey, conducted in August, reflects food budget comparisons at 23 programs, some 7% of the 345 NCAA Division I schools.

Thirty-one of the 53 full-time sports dietitians nationwide who head up the nutrition program in their respective athletic departments qualified to participate in the study, most of them from the NCAA Power 5 Conferences, per CPSDA.

CPSDA said that its survey findings "clearly revealed that many more NCAA Div. I programs are feeding all of their athletes now — an average of 569 per school, which accounts for essentially all intercollegiate athletes in a typical athletic program — compared to providing meals and snacks for an average of 368 athletes per school a year earlier."

According to Cincinnati-based CPSDA, sports nutrition has been a "slow growth proposition in college and professional ranks dating back to the 1980s, when the University of Nebraska, Penn State and precious few other schools were leveraging science to feed athletes the proper blend of foods and beverages to refuel."

Only 13 colleges had a full-time sports dietitian on staff in 2007, according to CPSDA president Scott Sehnert, sports dietitian at Auburn University.

There were none in professional sports at that time, but ten NFL teams have at least one full-time sports dietitian today, according to Sehnert.

In addition, sInce the NCAA limitation rules were lifted, 11 colleges hired their first full-time sports dietitians in 2014 with another four hires during the first half of 2015. Four sports dietitians who were working part-time for their school a year ago were promoted to a full-time position, according to the survey,

The study also shows that removing food limitations has "increased the accountability for sports dietitians working with these programs." Eight out of ten are working considerably more hours now, according to the survey, 36% of them by 15 or more hours per week.

"Much more administrative work, and more interaction with food service," Sarah Wick, Ohio State sports dietitian, said in a statement. "We have more athletes to work with. At the same time, we also know that more full-time jobs will be opening up for students of dietetics who volunteer for us now, which is good for them, and very good for our profession."

Former CPSDA president Dave Ellis, who doubled as both strength coach and sports nutritionist as a student at Nebraska beginning in 1982, credits then head football coach Tom Osborne with setting the gold standard for feeding athletes.

“Tom was and is a visionary on the value of fueling student-athletes, and he won three national football championships with the Cornhuskers, which validated his beliefs,” said Ellis, who according to CPSDA has installed sports nutrition programs for dozens of college athletic programs and professional sports teams. “But here we are 30 years later and the full-time jobs for sports dietitians are only just beginning to get firm traction, including within the NBA as teams have just placed the first such positions in the last few weeks.”

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