Top
QUICK HITS

• Tostitos, the Official Chip and Dip of the NFL, is offering a personalized ad for every person throwing a Super Bowl party at Tostitos.com, "Super Bowl Ads for All, a digital "invite creator that composes a completely unique and personalized Super Bowl party invitation."

• Dale Earnhardt Jr. will make his NBC debut as a contributor during the network’s coverage of Super Bowl LII on Feb. 4, traveling to Minnesota to participate in NBC’s Super Bowl Pre-Game Show; and then at the Olympic Winter Games, beginning Feb. 8,when he will travel to PyeongChang.

• FanDuel has named Mike Raffensperger CMO. He previously was head of marketing for Amazon Advertising; prior to that, he was director of digital marketing & strategy for DirecTV.

• NBC Olympics has produced a two-part original series in advance of its 2,400 hours of coverage of XXIII Olympic Winter Games from South Korea, Go for the Gold and Meet Team USA, which will stream on Netflix beginning today (Jan.15).

POLL POSITION
Which Team Will Win Overwatch League 2018?
 
pollcode.com free polls
KEEPING SCORE

Top NBA All-Star Game Votes (To Date)
Eastern Conference
1.  Giannis Antetokounmpo (MIL) 863,416
2.  LeBron James (CLE) 856,080
3.  Kyrie Irving (BOS) 802,834
4.  Joel Embiid (PHI) 433,161
5. Kristaps Porzingis (NYK) 359,459
6.  DeMar DeRozan (TOR) 259,368
7.  Victor Oladipo (IND) 251,886
8.  Kevin Love (CLE) 221,969
9.  Ben Simmons (PHI) 210,085
10. John Wall (WAS) 175,990
Western Conference
1. Kevin Durant (GSW) 767,402
2. Stephen Curry (GSW) 735,115
3. James Harden (HOU) 602,040
4. Russell Westbrook (OKC) 438,469
5. Klay Thompson (GSW) 359,442
6. DeMarcus Cousins (NOP) 356,340
7. Draymond Green (GSW) 325,612
8. Manu Ginobili (SAS) 231,460
9. Kawhi Leonard (SAS) 212,650
10. Carmelo Anthony (OKC) 194,239

The 67th NBA All-Star Game will take place on Sunday, Feb. 18 at Staples Center in Los Angeles. TNT will televise (8 PM ET)

BUY SELL

Top-Selling NFL Jerseys By Team 2017 At Dick’s Sporting Goods
1. Dallas Cowboys
2. New England Patriots
3. Pittsburgh Steelers
4. Philadelphia Eagles
5. Denver Broncos
6. Carolina Panthers
7. New York Giants
8. Seattle Seahawks
9. Atlanta Falcons
10. Cincinnati Bengals
11. Houston Texans
12. Minnesota Vikings
13. Detroit Lions
14. Chicago Bears
15. Green Bay Packers
16. Oakland Raiders
17. Kansas City Chiefs
18. Baltimore Ravens
19. Washington Redskins
20. Arizona Cardinals

SOURCE: DICK'S SPORTING GOODS

SEARCH

NYSportsJournalism.com + Topic Of Requested Search

Bullitt: Molly McQueen Aussie Open Ads Below

COLLEGE

CFB Title Games '21-24
No. 1 Colleges Since '92
NCAA: More Health $$$
Cancer Drives Home
NCAA Reballs Madness

Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future.
Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/johnfkenn121400.html#46Ul8rBF4XpB4lo0.99
Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future.
Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/johnfkenn121400.html#JZxA5jXY4rCwemgZ.99
Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future.
Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/johnfkenn121400.html#JZxA5jXY4rCwemgZ.99
Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future.
Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/johnfkenn121400.html#46Ul8rBF4XpB4lo0.99
Tuesday
May022017

Report Calls On NCAA To Increase Funds For Health, Diversity Of Head Coaches

By Barry Janoff

May 2, 2017: A major report has been released that is urging the NCAA and universities aligned with the College Football Playoff to increase the amount of revenue in "national initiatives supporting the health and safety of football players and in programs to increase diversity among football coaches."

According to the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics, the CFP must "demonstrate national leadership on health and safety issues" and also "step up to address the shortage of diversity in coaching in Football Bowl Subdivision" as well as men’s and women’s DIv. I hoops.

The Knight Commission — formed in 1989 to promote reforms that support and strengthen the educational mission of college sports— has released data that highlight the need for more financial health support as well as the continuing lack of diversity in Division I football as well as men's and women's basketball.

"It's time for the CFP to demonstrate national leadership on health and safety issues and to step up to address the shortage of diversity in coaching in FBS college football," Arne Duncan, Knight Commission co-chair and former U.S. Secretary of Education, said in a statement.

Also via the Knight Commission, "While there have been pockets of improvement, diversity among coaches hasn't increased much since 2007-08, the earliest year with comparable data."

"As a starter — and as a bare minimum that would grow over time — the Knight Commission would like to see at least one penny of every dollar in CFP revenue allocated for programs to develop a deeper and more diverse talent pool in college football coaching," said Duncan. "We would encourage presidents and athletics directors to seize the opportunity to boost diversity and make this a real priority."

The Commission said that if its recommendation had been in place last year, the CFP would have devoted $4.3 million to support diversity programs — the same amount that four schools alone paid in bonuses to their football coaches for their teams' participation in the 2016 CFP games.

Last year, the NCAA spent under $200,000 on professional development programs for minority football coaches using its March Madness basketball tournament revenues.

Regarding health issues, according to the Knight Commission, CFP revenues are currently distributed back to schools that compete in the FBS.

"While some of these funds are used to support athletes' education, including athletic scholarships and medical care and expenses at the campus level, the Commission believes a meaningful portion of CFP revenues should be used to bolster national initiatives critical to the future health of football," the Commission reported.

At its meeting last spring, the Commission called on the NCAA to increase the "restricted uses" of the funding it provides to schools so that such funding is used solely for athletes' education or their health and safety benefits and protections.

The Commission during its meeting late last week commended the NCAA's "one-time distribution of $200 million last month to college athletics departments, in amounts ranging from $165,000 to more than $1.3 million, with the proviso that the funds had to be used for 'the direct benefit' of college athletes."

The Knight Commission said that the NCAA does currently funds national health and safety initiatives, including those of special importance to football, such as national studies of concussions in college sports. A recent rule change, effective this fall, would eliminate the pre-season football tradition of two contact practices a day. Contact practices would be limited to one a day, with additional restrictions on other activities during the pre-season.

Also, under a proposed settlement of a class-action concussion lawsuit, the NCAA will spend $70 million to set up a medical monitoring program for current and former college athletes, and $5 million to research the prevention and treatment of concussions.

The Pac-12 Conference is the only FBS conference to set aside a portion of its CFP funds toward research that impacts athlete health and well-being, per the Knight Commission.

Regarding the issue of diversity in college football among FBS (formerly Div. I) programs, more than 83% of head coaches are white while 10% are black and under 7% are of other non-white designation, including Hispanic and Asian, according to data provided by the Knight Commission.

In 2007, more than 93% of head coaches were white, 5% were black, nearly 7% were Hispanic or Asian.

Concurrently, less than 38% of athletes in FBS programs are white while more than 48% are black and another 14% Hispanic, Asian or of other ethnic origin.

In Div. I men’s basketball, nearly 72% of head coaches are white and 26% black, while 25% of the athletes are white, more than 57% black and more than 17% Hispanic, Asian or of other ethic backgrounds.

In 2007, 70.5% of head coaches were white, 28.3% were black.

"We're heartened by the NCAA's action," said co-chair Carol Cartwright, "but we would like to see that practice become the norm."

Back to Home Page