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• Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame Finalists Class of 2018: Ray Allen, Maurice Cheeks, Charles “Lefty” Driesell, Hugh Evans, Grant Hill, Jason Kidd, Steve Nash, Rudy Tomjanovich, Chris Webber, Kim Mulkey, Katie Smith, Tina Thompson, Wayland Baptist University. Class of 2018 will be named during the NCAA Men’s Final Four weekend in San Antonio March 31-April 2.

• Serena Williams, who said her first auto purchase was a while Lincoln Navigator SUV she named “Ginger,” has signed to become an official spokesperson for the brand. A social media-based marketing campaign includes videos of Williams talking about and driving the 2018 Navigator, with ongoing videos to follow. “Partnering with a brand like Navigator comes from a genuine place,” she said in the first video. “Let’s just be honest: Serena Williams needs to be in the new Navigator.”

• The Smashing Pumpkins unveil 'Shiny And Oh So Bright' 36-city tour, their first tour in nearly 20 years, with founding members Billy Corgan, Jimmy Chamberlin, James Iha. Produced by Live Nation.

KEEPING SCORE

IMDbPro’s ALL-TIME TOP-GROSSING, LIVE-ACTION SPORTS-THEMED MOVIES*
1. The Blind Side (2009) $255.9M
2. The Karate Kid (2010) $176.6M
3. The Waterboy (1998) $161.5M
4. The Longest Yard (2005) $158.1M
5. Jerry Maguire (1996) $153.9M
6. Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby (2006) $148.2M
7. Rocky IV (1985) $127.8M
8. Rocky III (1982) $125.1M
9. Seabiscuit (2003) $120.2M
10. Blades of Glory (2007) $118.6M
*These are the Top 10 domestic-grossing, live-action movies with sports as a central theme. These numbers have not been adjusted for inflation.

Data provided by Box Office Mojo

BUY SELL

Most-Watched Winter Olympics in U.S. TV History
1. Lillehammer, 1994* 204 million
2. Vancouver, 2010 190 million
3. Salt Lake City, 2002 187 million
T4. Torino, 2006 184 million
T4. Albertville, 1992 184 million
T4. Nagano, 1998 184 million
* Nancy Kerrigan/Tonya Harding incident

Source NBC Sports

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Olympics: Y&R 'Fearless' Winter Games Ads Below

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CFB Title Games '21-24
No. 1 Colleges Since '92
NCAA: More Health $$$
Cancer Drives Home
NCAA Reballs Madness

Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future.
Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/johnfkenn121400.html#46Ul8rBF4XpB4lo0.99
Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future.
Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/johnfkenn121400.html#JZxA5jXY4rCwemgZ.99
Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future.
Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/johnfkenn121400.html#JZxA5jXY4rCwemgZ.99
Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future.
Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/johnfkenn121400.html#46Ul8rBF4XpB4lo0.99
Tuesday
Sep192017

With A Combined $1B, PepsiCo, Coke, Anheuser-Busch Are Top Sponsor Spenders

By Barry Janoff

September 19, 2017: Although three of the top four biggest players in sponsorship deals reduced their respective budgets by about $10 million in 2016 versus 2015, the Big Four each surpassed the $260 million mark and remained in the same order as the previous year: PepsiCo, Anheuser-Busch InBev, The Coca-Cola Co. and Nike, Inc.

Together, these four spent nearly $1.2 billion on sponsorship deals last year, according to the just released 2016 Sponsorship Spend Report from research and consulting firm ESP (formerly IEG), Chicago.

In fact, the Top Ten remained the same as 2015, although the order changed slightly.

Adidas North America moved from up from No. 7 to No. 5, AT&T was tied for No. 5, Ford Motor Co. moved from No. 8 to No. 7, Toyota USA dropped from No. 6 to No. 8,; and Verizon and General Motors switched places, with the telecom company now No. 9 and the automaker at No. 10.

Together, the Top Ten companies spent more than $2.2 billion on sponsorships last year.

Also, continuing a pattern from the previous two years, the 11 biggest spenders of 2016 belong to just four categories: beverage, auto, sport apparel and telecommunications, according to ESP.

Expanding the list, the three categories with the most companies represented among the 106 biggest sponsors also did not change: auto (11); beverage (9) and banking (9).

Insurance (8) followed.

"Spending trends for the companies on the list show that only 19 (18%) increased sponsorship allocations from 2015 to 2016, 31 (29%) spent less and 57 (53%) spent the same year-to-year."

PepsiCo outspent all other companies in sponsorships, topping $360 million, according to ESP.

Pepsi’s deals include the NFL, NBA and NHL.

Anheuser-Busch InBev was the only other company to top $300 million, spending $350 million-plus last year.

Among the company’s big deals are the NFL (Bud Light, pictured top), Anheuser-Busch InBev is also the most active sponsor of music festivals, tours and venues, per ESP.

Rival MillerCoors was No. 11 overall with $120 million in sponsor spend.

The only two other companies to top $200 million in sponsor spend in 2016 were Coca-Cola ($265 million-plus) and Nike ($260 million-plus).

One big move this year: Coca-Cola taking over as an official partner for MLB, replacing Pepsi.

Coca-Cola’s alliances also include the NCAA, the International Olympic Committee, the U.S. Olympic Committee and FIFA.

According to the ESP Sponsorship Spend Report, of the companies that were listed in 2015 but not on the list in 2016, Nascar team sponsorship spends took a big hit.

"Six of the 15 companies that left the rankings in 2016 drastically reduced or eliminated Nascar team spending: Aaron’s, Kraft Heinz, Bass Pro, Clorox, Go Daddy and Scotts," according to ESP.

In addition, Toyota USA dropped from No. 6 to No. 8 "in large part because of the shuttering of one of its Nascar teams, Michael Waltrip Racing."

On the up side, Monster Beverage was tied for No. 70 overall with $20 million in sponsor spend in 2016, and that should go up due to its alliance with Nascar, formed in 2017.

Lowe’s, a big Nascar player, topped the retail category (No. 35) with a $40 million spend.

Verizon Communications moved from No. 10 to No. 9 "mostly thanks to a new NBA partnership."

Automotive was the category leader with the most number of companies spending at least $20 million in sponsorships in 2016. 

They included Ford, Toyota, GM, Hyundai (No. 14, $85M), Mercedes-Benz (No. 22, $55M), Honda (No. 35, $40M), Kia and Nissan (tied at No. 44, $35M), BMW (No. 58, $25M) and Volkswagen and Chrysler Group (tied at No. 70, $20-$25M).

In other areas, FedEx led delivery (No. 12, $95 million spend), Microsoft led consumer tech companies (No. 13, $90 million), financial was headed by Bank of America (No. 15, $75M), P&G was in front among consumer goods (No. 15, $75M), McDonald’s led QSR’s (No. 27, $50M), Mars Inc. topped he food category (No. 35, $40 million) and Shell lead the fuel division (No. 35, $40M).

"Trends for companies on the list show that only 19 (18%) increased sponsorship allocations, 31 (29%) spent less and 57 (53%) spent the same."

Marriott International topped travel and moved from No. 68 to No. 43 ($35M) "on the strength of its merger with Starwood Hotels & Resorts," according to the ESP Sponsorship Spend Report.

In the sports apparel category, behind Nike and adidas were Under Armour (No. 18, $70M) and New Era (No. 50, $30M).

According to ESP, the spending estimates for the companies on the list reflect amounts spent on sponsorship fees of U.S. properties and the portion of spending on international properties that is directed to the U.S. market.

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